Poetry analysis in the station of

One of the best aspects of poetry is its total lack of rules. The art form is filled to the brim and beyond with every imaginable idea under the sun, and throughout time, various poets have tried out just about everything.

Poetry analysis in the station of

In just two lines, Pound distils the entire manifesto for Imagism into a vivid piece of poetry, what T. But what does the poem mean, precisely? The poem can be summarised in one sentence. Start with that image.

Analysis of In a Station of the Metro by Ezra Pound

The central image of the faces as petals is clear and simple, and can instantly be visualized. It draws together the urban world of the Paris Metro with the natural world, the world of leaves and tree boughs.

Pound was influenced here by the Japanese haiku form, which utilises images from nature to connect the momentary with the timeless, the miniature with the transcendent. Words are like Leaves; and where they most abound, Much Fruit of Sense beneath is rarely found. But as with T.

But the poem stays in the memory partly because of the frailty of the image which is being suggested: Such a technique is less about juxtaposing, or placing side by side, the two images, and more about superposition, that is, placing one on top of the other.

Yet it cries out for analysis and discussion, since its striking style and form suggest much in just a few words. The brevity of life, the brevity of the Imagist poem.

Poetry analysis in the station of

Ezra Pound photographed in Kensington, London, October 22, Knopf, ; Wikimedia Commons; public domain.“In a Station of the Metro” Analysis Ezra Pound was a master poet. During his career, Pound used imagist ideas and would write poems in such a clear and concise manner. During his career, Pound used imagist ideas and would write poems in such a clear and concise manner.

In this quick poem, Pound describes watching faces appear in a metro station. It is unclear whether he is writing from the vantage point of a passenger on the train itself or on the platform.

The setting is Paris, France, and as he describes these faces as a "crowd," meaning the station is quite busy. Line 1. The apparition of these faces in the crowd; The poet is watching faces appear in a crowded metro (subway) station.

Poetry analysis in the station of

You wouldn’t know it only from reading the poem, but we’re in Paris, which means that everyone looks really nice. ‘In a Station of the Metro’, written by Ezra Pound in , is the Imagist poem par excellence.

In just two lines, Pound distils the entire manifesto for Imagism into a vivid piece of poetry, what T.

In a Station of the Metro by Ezra Pound - Poems | caninariojana.com

E. Hulme had earlier called ‘dry, hard, classical verse’. Stanzas Observations: Is the poem divided into stanzas? If so, how many? Are the stanzas all the same length? How many lines are there in each stanza?

Questions for Analysis 1. If the poem is organized into stanzas, why do you think the poet decided to start a new stanza? (Hint: what is each stanza about?) 2. the station By Robert J. Hastings TUCKED AWAY in our subconscious minds is an idyllic vision in which we see ourselves on a long journey that spans an entire continent.

How to Analyze Poetry